Elective Courses 2021/22

Year 2 and 3 B.A. ELECTIVE COURSES (3 ECTS) / 2 DSL i 3 DSL (razem) ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE, lista A (realizują tylko studenci, którzy wybrali program studiów ze “ścieżką filologiczną”):


Year 3 B.A. ELECTIVE COURSES (4 ECTS) / 3 DSL ZAJĘCIA FAKULTATYWNE, lista B (realizują wszyscy studenci):

LINGUISTIC AND CULTURAL ASPECTS OF TRANSLATION

(Językowe i kulturowe aspekty przekładu)

Instructor: Jacek Woźny

Course description: We will study and discuss the linguistic and cultural aspects of the selected key topics of translation studies, such as translation equivalence, translation strategy, translation techniques, translation of proper names and nonstandard language, untranslatability, literal translation, translation of idioms, translation errors and more.

Grading policy: class quizzes, end-of-semester test, class participation

Teaching methods: lecture / tutorial, discussion,  textbook-based exercises; text, sound, video files, Office 365 tools, class quizzes

Selected literature:

Steiner, G. After Babel. Aspects of Language and Translation. Oxford: Oxford University Press;

Jakobson, R. On linguistic aspects of translation. In: L. Venuti, The Translation Studies Reader, chapter 8;

Newmark, P. Approaches to Translation. New York Phoenix ELT;

Hejwowski, K. Kognitywno-komunikacyjna teoria przekładu. Warszawa: PWN;

Venuti, L. The Translator’s Invisibility. London: Routledge;

Berezowski, L. Dialect in Translation. Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego;

Garcarz, M. Przekład slangu w filmie. Kraków: Wydawnictwo Tertium;

Lewicki, R. Obcość w odbiorze przekładu. Lublin: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu M. Curie – Skłodowskiej.

Childhood and Children’s Culture in the Anthropocene - dr hab. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak, prof. UWr.

Although children and young people are the generation that has contributed little to the climate crisis, they are the most vulnerable to its health, social, and economic impacts. It is also they who will have to seek further remedies. The climate crisis itself and the many other phenomena we are witnessing (e.g. acidification of waters and the expansion of dead zones in the seas and oceans, plastic pollution, the loss of biodiversity) are merely symptoms of the irreversible changes to natural processes and environmental conditions caused by human activity since the onset of industrialization. The severity of these changes is such that we can say that we are living in the Anthropocene or the Age of Man. Yet the concept of the Anthropocene has become both widely used and heavily contested: while it requires a paradigm shift in understanding what it means to be human and a radical reconsideration of the relationship between the social and natural worlds, it may also normalize human dominance and obfuscate human responsibilities and impacts in various parts of the world. Therefore, it is worth undertaking an interdisciplinary reflection both on how the young generation experiences the Anthropocene and on the possibilities and ways of developing intergenerational actions to mitigate past problems and prevent the current situation from exacerbating. The course aims to initiate a multi-faceted discussion on these topics in the context of selected cultural texts addressed to young audiences. We will reflect together on literary and film representations of the Anthropocene and the experiences of the young generation, on pro-climate activism, and on the role of children's culture in education for the protection of the planet. The course will culminate with a collaborative creative project – our joint making of cartonera books (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17wZw8ZmNqI).

Selected sources

WALL-E. Dir. Andrew Stanton, 2008.

Tan, Shaun. The Lost Thing. 2000.

Thunberg, Greta. No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference. 2019.

Bertagna, Julie. Exodus. 2002.

Bacigalupi, Paolo. Ship Breaker, 2010.

Martinez, Xiuhtezcatl. We Rise: The Earth Guardians Guide to Building a Movement that Restores the Planet. 2017.

Espero? Dir. Simone Giampaolo, Henrik Linnes, Yifan Hu, 2017.

From Anne to Anya. Migration, Multiculturalism, and East-Central European Diaspora(s) in Canadian Children’s Literature

Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki

The course aims to familiarize students with Canadian literature for children and young adults focused on multiculturalism, migration, and cultural memory of East-Central European diasporas. Excerpts from novels and picturebooks by numerous authors (e.g., L. M. Montgomery, William Kurelek, Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch, Laura Langston, and Heather Kirk) will be discussed in class. The analysis of literary texts combined with the examination of critical works will help the students understand the specificity of Canadian culture and the role of children's literature in promoting the policy of multiculturalism.

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a further understanding of the specificity of Canadian children's literature and its role in promoting the policy of multiculturalism.
  • Analyze different types of Canadian texts (including multimodal genres) for children and adolescents and determine their role in implementing multiculturalism
  • Create short critical texts on Canadian children's and youth literature using various theoretical sources

 

GRADING PROCEDURES:

Final test 40%
Response paper 30%
Discussion questions 30%

Assignments:

  1. (to be done in groups): students prepare discussion questions about selected theoretical texts
  2. (to be done individually): final test checking the students’ knowledge (open questions requiring cross-sectional answers).
  3. (to be done individually): Each student is expected to submit a short response paper presenting their understanding of one of the topics from this course. Each student selects two texts (a children’s book and a theoretical/analytical work) and writes a short response papers about them. The papers are expected to stimulate student’s in-depth understanding of one of the course topics. The paper will be submitted to the lecturer in e-format at the following address: .pl The review you submit must be original and contain MLA documentation.

The paper structure is:

Student’s name, date and topic

Formulation of the problem

Formulation of author’s hypothesis

Arguments supporting your answer

Formulation of conclusion

Format of the paper is: up to 2 pages maximum typewritten, Times New Roman font, 2,0 spaced in a 12-point font.

  • All students are expected to attend class discussions.

 
prof. Tadeusz Piotrowski Global English
 

Global English canmeaneither native English as the firstlanguageusedglobally, or English used as the second, foreign, etc., used as a global system of communication (aninternational lingua franca). In thiscourse we shalllookintobothtypes. English as a global system of communicationleadsalso to the question: what the likelyfuture of English could be, and whether the hypotheticalfuturecanhavean influence on prospects of students. 

Year 1 M.A. ELECTIVE COURSES (5 ECTS)

INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF INTERPRETING

(Wstęp do teorii i praktyki przekładu ustnego)

Instructor: Marcin Walczyński

Course description:

The course aims at familiarising the master’s programme students with the theoretical and practical aspects of interpreting – perhaps one of the most demanding types of translational activities.

In the first (theoretical) part of the course, the students will be introduced to interpreting as a complex multitasking activity of linguistic, interactional, cognitive and psycho-affective nature. Thus, this course component will involve reading and discussing various academic texts devoted to selected aspects of interpreting, which will help the students become prepared for the practical part of the course.

In the practice-oriented part, the students will have a chance to develop and further practice sight translation and consecutive interpreting (both without and with note-taking). Overall, the general objective of the course is to provide the students with the basic theoretical knowledge of selected aspects of interpreting and its various forms as well as to develop the students’ basic interpreting skills.

Grading policy: (1) a written assignment on a selected topic related to interpreting (50%); (2) sight translation test (25%); (2) consecutive interpreting test (25%)

Note: Due to the nature of interpreting as bilingual activity and the fact that the course will be taught in both English and Polish, the command of Polish is necessary.

Instructor’s bio note: Marcin Walczyński, Ph.D., D.Litt. [dr hab.], assistant professor in the Department of Translation Studies (Institute of English Studies, University of Wrocław, Poland), certified translator and interpreter of English, translation and interpreting trainer, translation agency owner; his scholarly interests include: interpreting studies (interpreter psychology, especially psycho-affective factors, interpreting training, certified interpreting), translation studies (certified translation, translator’s roles and functions, translation training, business and legal translation) and languages for special purposes (business and legal English). Contact:

International Children’s Film - dr hab. Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak

This course on children's cinema--including family film, short films, and documentaries--offers insights into film as a global medium in children's culture that both reflects dominant cultural assumptions about childhood and caters to and shapes children's cognitive, emotional and aesthetic needs. The course encourages students to explore research approaches to film and the influence of digital culture on children’s emotional and cognitive experience of film. The course also introduces students to children’s film translation, film education, and creative processes in the making of animated films. Students will be asked to write reviews and lesson plans that will later be published on edukacjafilmowa.pl. The course is offered as part of Erasmus Mundus International Master: Children’s Literature, Media & Culture (https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/erasmusmundus/clmc/).

Selected films

Real Women Have Curves (2002), dir. Patricia Cardoso

Udaan (2010), dir. Vikramaditya Motwane

Peter and the Wolf (2006), dir. Suzie Templeton, UK and Poland)

Crow: The Legend (201)7, dir. Eric Darnell)

Chinese New Year – Nian (2021), dir. Lulu Wang.

Camaquen (2021), dir. Maria Jose Campos.

Kubo and the Two Strings (2016), dir. Travis Knight

Year 2 M.A. ELECTIVE COURSES (5 ECTS)

REPRESENTATIONS OF CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD IN FILM

Dr. Mateusz Świetlicki

The course on past and contemporary representations of childhood in international film explores the significance of the child and childhood experience as appropriated in films addressed to adult audiences. Close readings of films (e.g., “Jojo Rabbit,” dir. T. Waititi, “Mommy” dir. X. Dolan,  “Gifted” dir. Marc Webb) encourage a critical understanding of the power of the film medium to endorse, question, or problematize perceptions of children, adults and child-adult relations. Analyses of films' composition and their role in popular culture fosters film literacy as a crucial element of general media literacy.

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a further understanding of representations of childhood in media, specifically in relation to film.
  • Apply further knowledge on the interaction between concepts of childhood and representations of childhood in films.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of film literacy as a part of general media literacy.

GRADING PROCEDURES:

55% Review

35% Discussion questions

10% Quizzes and participation in class discussion            

Assignments:

  1. (to be done in pairs or groups): students prepare discussion questions about selected films and lead the class discussion.
  2. (to be done individually): in-class quizzes:  some classes will begin with a short quiz (or kahoot) on the film read at home or discussed in the previous class.  Please arrive to class on time to take the quiz.
  3. (to be done individually): Each student is expected to submit a review presenting his/her understanding of one of the topics from this course. Each student selects two films (one listed in the course and one not listed in the course) and writes an analytical review, using the knowledge acquired during the course. The reviews are expected to stimulate student’s in-depth understanding of one of the course topics. The reviews will be submitted to the lecturer in e-format at the following address: .pl The review you submit must be original and contain footnotes/endnotes and a bibliography.

The review structure is:

Student’s name, date and topic

Formulation of the problem

Formulation of author’s hypothesis

Arguments supporting your answer

Formulation of conclusion

Format of the paper is: up to 4 pages maximum typewritten, Times New Roman font, 2,0 spaced in a 12-point font.

  • All students are expected to attend class discussions.

 

Year 2 M.A. TOPICAL LECTURES (4 ECTS)

prof. Tadeusz Piotrowski -Global English 

Global English canmeaneither native English as the firstlanguageusedglobally, or English used as the second, foreign, etc., used as a global system of communication (aninternational lingua franca). In thiscourse we shalllookintobothtypes. English as a global system of communicationleadsalso to the question: what the likelyfuture of English could be, and whether the hypotheticalfuturecanhavean influence on prospects of students. 


Prof. dr hab. Ewa Kębłowska-Ławniczak

An introduction to representations of urbanity in literature, non-fiction, visual culture and media.

A considerable majority of literary texts and films locates its characters in urban environments. Literature, film and media make use of city images as well as create them in a clever way. Obviously, stereotypes proliferate and we hear about city girls and city boys. Many clichés concerning city life and life outside the city (or in the country) are very old and can be derived from the  stories told in Genesis. This dichotomy of city versus country functions comfortably in European culture till the end of the 19th century.However, today we can say with a great deal of confidence that our life in the Western societies is urban rather than rural. Perhaps therefore studies of urbanization, that is our habitat and way of life, develop in diverse areas including sociology, culture, literature, urban planning and communication.  The lecture will focus on various approaches to the ongoing discussion concerning our ways of imagining and experiencing urbanity, sometimes in opposition to life in the country - imagining it, among other ways, as inspiring, fascinating, evil, alienating, consumer-oriented or erotic. The interplay of representations and representational space altered by the practice of everyday life and the production of new places will furnish one of the central topics.

Is there such a thing as a distinctly urban way of life? What does this way of life encourage in terms of identity and social collectivity? Does it encourage or discourage social bonds? How does this way of life affect traditional notions of social difference and value systems? Trying to provide answers to some of these questions, the lecture will refer to a variety of literary, historical, sociological and visual sources.

The lecture will refer to literary fictional cities (Shakespeare’s Venice) and to non-literary real locations  from various epochs, to media and films including Metropolis by Fritz Lang and The Blade Runner by Ridley Scott.

Exam/Final assessment: take-home response to lecture-related texts and topics.

Anthologies recommended for those who are interested in the subject:

Bridge, Gary and Sophie Watson (ed.). A Companion to the City. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. 2003.

Bridge, Gary and Sophie Watson (ed.). The Blackwell City Reader. Oxford: Wiley- Blackwell Publishing. 2010.Abington: Routledge. 2008.

Miles, Malcolm and Tim Hall, with Ian Borden (ed.). The City Cultures Reader.

Further reading:

Erdi-Lelandais, Gülçin (ed.). Understanding the City: Henri Lefebvre and Urban Studies. Camb. Scholars Publishing.2014.

Lefebvre, Henri. The Production of Space. Blackwell, Oxf. UK& Camb. USA. 1991 [1984].

Tuan, Yi Fu. Space and Place. The Perception of Experience. University of Minnesota Press, 2001.

Certeau, Michael de. The Practice of Everyday Life.  University of California Press 2011[1984]